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The Tobacco Youth Protection Act: Bill S-15

Please follow this link for the full text of the bill:         Bill S-15: The Tobacco Youth Protection Act

Bill S-15: Senate Committee Hearings

Bill S-15: Progression of Legislation

Bill S-15: Events to Date

The Tobacco Youth Protection Act's Table of Events

 

Overview of the Principles of Bill S-15

Objective:

To provide a substantial stable source of funding for projects that focus on reducing tobacco consumption by young people, under the direction of a foundation that is at arms length from government.

The new draft bill incorporates all of the principles of S-13, The Tobacco Industry Responsibility Act (TIRA). S-13 was introduced two years ago with the same objective as the Tobacco Youth Protection Act, but was struck down by the Speaker of the House of Commons on a procedural technicality.


CDC Model:

In August of 1999, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, issued a paper called "Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs." The paper focused, in particular, on the successful programs in California and Massachusetts and provided ranges of spending for different sizes of jurisdictions and recommended program allocations. The new draft legislation requires the foundation to come up with a Canadian version of the CDC model for use in Canada.

CDC Executive Summary
CDC Fact Sheet
Entire Report (CDC Web Site)

The Tobacco Youth Protection Act has cured the procedural problems and significantly improves on S-13 in the following ways: 

The levy has been increased from $0.0025 per cigarette to $0.0075 per cigarette. Clause 35.

This works out to 3/4 of a cent per cigarette, 19 cents per pack, or $1.50 per carton, and will produce in the area of $360 million a year, or $12 per capita. (This figure is in the bottom quartile of the range recommended by the Atlanta Center for Disease Control).

In August of 1999, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, issued a paper called "Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs." The paper focused, in particular, on the successful programs in California and Massachusetts and provided ranges of spending for different sizes of jurisdictions and recommended program allocations. The new draft legislation requires the foundation to come up with a Canadian version of the CDC model for use in Canada.

For jurisdictions the size of Canada the CDC proposed spending between $9.00 and $24.00 per capita. (Converted into Canadian funds.)

A "levy for industry purposes" to provide for stable funding. Clause 35.

The funding is from tobacco manufacturers to a foundation that is independent of them because, as they have stated publicly, they are not credible in the area of tobacco control. Clause 29.

Transparent decision making. Clauses 24, 44 & 46.

Rules dealing with conflict of interest. Clause 25.

Independent governance. Clauses 12 through 18 and 30, 31, & 32.

First, because the evaluation process necessitates publishing both successes and failures.

Failure is hard for government to associate with, while the health community knows failure is a key part of the learning process.

Second, to avoid political interference.

A 5% cap on administration. Clause 27 subsection 3.

10% of all projects is set aside for evaluation. Clause 31 subsection 3.

The Preamble and Part III of the new bill have been added and specifically drafted to address the procedural concerns of the Speaker of the House of Commons. The bill has been examined by procedural experts who have had extensive experience in both the Senate and the Commons.

Parliament receives an annual report and has a five year review of the legislation’s effectiveness. Clause 45 and 46.

Provision has been made for an annual audit by the Auditor General. Part VI.